Preakness Budweiser InfieldFest – Tickets – Preakness InfieldFest at Pimlico Race Course – Baltimore, MD – May 20th, 2017

Preakness Budweiser InfieldFest

Preakness Budweiser InfieldFest

Sam Hunt, Good Charlotte, LOCASH, High Valley

Sat 5/20/17

7:00 am

$90 - $155

Preakness Budweiser InfieldFest
Preakness Budweiser InfieldFest
The multi-entertainment Budweiser InfieldFest features nationally-recognized musicians and bands, two stages, the popular MUG Club and unique attractions throughout the day as fans await the running of the Preakness Stakes.
Sam Hunt
Sam Hunt
Hailing from rural Cedartown, Georgia, Sam Hunt is quickly establishing a name for himself and becoming one of Nashville’s most talked about young talents.

Hunt has been writing songs and playing music since his days as quarterback at the University of Alabama Birmingham. Following graduation, Hunt made the move to Music City to pursue songwriting full-time.

Shortly after settling into the Nashville scene, Hunt was signed to a publishing deal and started working with some of the top writers in the business. Hunt began to develop his craft and quickly gained recognition as a gifted singer-songwriter.

Since moving to Nashville, Hunt has garnered cuts with some of country music’s biggest stars including Kenny Chesney’s No. 1 smash “Come Over,” Billy Currington’s latest “We Are Tonight,” and Keith Urban’s “Cop Car.”

Hunt’s own eclectic style owes its roots to country music with influences in pop, folk and R&B music. Sam has been winning audiences over throughout the southeast in recent years with his soulful sound, and is now on tour with David Nail with upcoming dates joining Little Big Town later this summer.

Between tour dates, Hunt is continuing to write and record songs for his upcoming debut album due out this year.
Good Charlotte
Good Charlotte
It would be easy to look at their accolades (more than 6 million albums sold in the U.S. alone and millions more fans around the world) and assume success has come naturally for GOOD CHARLOTTE. But from their earliest days as teenagers who formed the band in 1996 in garages in small-town Waldorf, Maryland, through the massive worldwide popularity of Top 10-charting albums The Young and the Hopeless, The Chronicles of Life and Death and Good Morning Revival and hit singles "The Anthem," "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous" and "I Just Wanna Live," the quintet have truly earned every achievement that's come their way.

The group—vocalist Joel Madden, guitarists Benji Madden and Billy Martin, bassist Paul Thomas and drummer Dean Butterworth—have done it not only with an odds-defying optimism and drive, but also an unbreakable emotional connection with their audience. That heart has been Good Charlotte's hallmark since day one, and it's the centerpiece of YOUTH AUTHORITY, the band's sixth studio album—their first album since returning from a five-year hiatus after the release of 2010's Cardiology, and the first release on the Madden brothers' newly formed MDDN label.

"We decided we were going to take this thing back on our terms," Benji Madden explains of the sudden decision to disband in 2011, following a period when they felt the music industry had manipulated their image and ideals. "We didn't know what it was going to look like, but we knew we just had to take it back. We had to take our baby back, and it had to be special to us again before it could be special to anyone else."

So they went off and—for the first time in forever—explored life. Joel and Benji set out as solo artists, releasing the ambitious album Greetings From California as The Madden Brothers. They became industry mentors and songwriters, working with acts like 5 Seconds Of Summer and Sleeping With Sirens, and they traveled Down Under to serve as judges on the Australian version of the hit TV show The Voice. When they returned in 2015 to record Youth Authority with producer John Feldmann (Blink-182, Panic! at the Disco), the hunger from the band's past had returned in full force.

"I don't know that we were making a record for other people to hear," Joel Madden says of Youth Authority. "We were having fun, and we just wanted to make one for us. We weren't trying to be commercially successful or critically acclaimed. No one knew who we were in 1999 when we made our first record; we just said what we had to say. We have a lot to say now, too. A lot of truth bled through on this record."

You'll hear this clarity from the opening strains of "Life Changes," urgent guitar strums from Benji before Joel bursts in with a fiery ad-libbed line that could double as Good Charlotte's mantra these days: "Let's go now; it's open season." The passion is there as the band back down detractors on "Keep Swinging," featuring Sleeping With Sirens' Kellin Quinn, and it's there as they explore the intricacies of love and relationships—from the contentious ("WAR") and dysfunctional ("Makeshift Love") to the dependent ("Stray Dogs") and perfectly imperfect ("Life Can't Get Much Better").

The pure emotion that underpins each of the album's 12 songs is drawn from the same place it always has: real life. Good Charlotte had been through life's ups and downs, and they distilled the lessons they learned into songs to guide their audience through their own turmoil. That was always part of their charm, and the promise of understanding and acceptance is what drew millions of fans to their music in the early 2000s.

"All we've ever wanted people to take away from our band is a sense of hope and encouragement," Benji says. "We make the records for the people listening who need the music like I did. There were records that got me through days at school or when shit was tough, and we want to make those records for other people. Good Charlotte is synonymous with disenfranchised youth and teenage angst. We'll forever be those misfits, the broken toys, the underdogs. We stick up for the little guys."

The sense of camaraderie shines bright on Youth Authority standout "The Outfield," with self-referential lines like, "We were the young and hopeless/We were the broken youth/You're not the only one they used/I was in the outfield, too." Benji admits the deeply personal nature of song, which features lyrics about his and Joel's tough upbringing (a recurring subject in the band's music, specifically their early days), left him hesitant about its spot on the album.

"The bravest thing you can do is be vulnerable—when a song makes my face red when I'm listening to it in front of someone," he says. "I was actually kind of embarrassed to put that song on the record, but that's when I knew we had to: When it's that real."

That authenticity has cemented Good Charlotte's legacy as one of the most popular and influential pop-punk bands of all time. It's in this way that their music lives on, not only through the band themselves but through a crop of younger artists they've inspired. Artists like 5 Seconds Of Summer and All Time Low preach the gospel of Good Charlotte to their fan bases—and, as a result, legions of new listeners discover the band daily, latching onto every meaningful word like fans did 15 years ago.

Now newly independent for the first time since their inception, the band can finally call the shots and enjoy full control of their career. There's no more compromise, no pressure to bow to anyone looking to define who they are or what they can or can't be. It feels like the early days again, when the only reason for playing music was out of love and not success, money or anything that comes along with stardom.

"If I don't have my integrity, what was the point of ever starting this band and fighting so hard?" Joel asks. "Imagine going from being poor and having low self-esteem and mattering to no one to finally making it and achieving your dreams, and then struggling with your self-image because of that. Getting to the other side and going, 'What was it all for?' We'd never be able to live with ourselves.

"I don't want to sell anything anymore or make something that's 'cool,'" he continues about Good Charlotte's mindset in 2016. "I don't want to try to make anyone happy. I just want to tell people who we are and say it how it is. When you stop fighting what you are and just be yourself, you're on a good path. You can finally be the best version of yourself."
LOCASH
LOCASH
It’s an exciting time to be LOCASH these days. That might very well be one of the biggest understatements in Nashville these days. Already in their career, the duo of Preston Brust and Chris Lucas have enjoyed hit singles, sold-out concert appearances here and abroad, and have tasted the top of the chart as two of Nashville’s quickest-rising songwriters. But, to quote the old saying... You Ain’t Seen Nothing Yet.



Recently signing with Reviver Records, the duo is joining forces with some of the biggest names on the Country Music business landscape. Brust says they could feel the team’s energy from the first meeting. “We haven’t felt an energy like this since the day we began our journey. This feels like it has all come together –the right label head, the right promo team, it finally feels like we’ve got all of our ducks in a row for the first time in our lives. We’ve been out there doing the grass roots thing for so long, and to feel it all come together, is so encouraging.”



As The LoCash Cowboys, the duo have made a presence at radio with such records as the feel-good anthem of “Here Comes Summer,” and the tender emotions of “Keep In Mind,” and “Best Seat In The House.” With a new name, there is an underlying current of new and exciting energy, but the music is the same style their fans have come to know. “We’ve been doing this for ten years now, and I sort of feel like we have grown up a little bit in the business. We’ve matured in the business, and learned how it all works. We just wanted to simplify things and get down to the roots of what we are all about. That’s what LOCASH means anyway is remembering where you come from, and your roots. Because of that, we decided to go with LOCASH and just keep it real simple. Everybody calls us that to begin with. I think we’ll always be referred to as LoCash Cowboys out there somewhere, which is ok. That’s how we started.”



That part together happened at Nashville’s Wildhorse Saloon, where the pair worked together in the club’s DJ booth. They talked about their influences – which range from Gospel (Preston’s great-uncle was Gospel legend Albert Brumley) to Rock and Roll bands such as Motley Crue and Quiet Riot. The two also talked about their dreams of a career in the business, which have come true beyond their wildest imagination – though they are far from done writing the chapters to their story.



An integral part of that LOCASH book is their songwriting. “I think that part of what we do reflects our different personalities, and what has happened in our lives,’ says Lucas. “The passing of my father was ‘The Best Seat In The House.’ Preston and I still write things like that. But, a lot of times, as songwriters, you get to go in someone else’s world, and try to think about what you would do in a situation. Some days, I feel like hearing something upbeat, and when there’s a lot of stuff going on in the world, we want to bring something a little fresh and make people want to roll down the window and smile. Then, there are songs that you have for when you’ve loved someone so much in your life, and you don’t want to let them go – like your wife and your kids, we have those songs too. It’s day by day what we write, and I don’t think any of that has changed. I just think the sound of it has evolved. We’re so excited to put it out so people can hear it.”



The duo has seen their profiles rise in the business thanks to a pair of hit singles from two of the format’s most iconic voices. “I think having Keith Urban recording ‘You Gonna Fly,’ and giving us our first number one song really changed it all, and Tim McGraw doing ‘Truck Yeah” a few months later was huge to us as songwriters. That was his comeback single on Big Machine, and to be a part of that was a great moment,” said Brust. And, the cuts keep coming! “We just got a cut from Joe Nichols,” he continues. “I think our songwriting really adds value to what we’re about. Sometimes, as songwriters, you write hundreds of songs, and you never know if people are on the money with what you’re doing or not, and then all of a sudden, somebody like a Keith Urban, Tim McGraw, or Joe Nichols cuts your songs, and it just makes you feel that someone is really listening and they appreciate what you do. It’s a reminder of why you get up everyday and do what you do.”



LOCASH has made believers out of Nashville, radio, and the corporate world, as well. They have earned endorsement deals from Dean Guitars, Under Armour and Mossy Oak apparel, Comcast, Bud Light, and Bowtick Bows and Crossbows, as well as Kicker Audio, who sponsored their “Livin’ Loud” tour. Their love of the outdoors has led to appearances on such lifestyle-oriented TV series as All Star Cast. Chris and Preston also believe in giving back to their community, by participating in such charities as D.A.R.E., St. Jude’s Children’s Hospital, and the T.J. Martell Foundation.



Other highlights on the LOCASH resume include performances on the TODAY Show, Jimmy Kimmel Live!, in Times Square in New York City on New Years’ Eve, as well as their debut at the historic stage of the Grand Ole Opry. Lucas also has great memories of taking their music abroad. “We have been able to take LOCASH worldwide. We’ve done some stuff in Germany and Switzerland, and we do a lot for the United States Military. Those shows always turn out to be some of the best shows we’ve ever done because when you’re overseas, and they don’t get the American music, it’s great to bring that to them. I’m an Army brat. My father, his grandfather, and great grandfather all were, and I’m the only one who didn’t. We really take advantage of every chance to perform for our troops, which is something we will always do. It’s a highlight not only of our careers, but also our lives.”



All along the way, the group is mindful of those who have stuck with them since day one – the fans. “There’s ups and there are downs, but one thing about our fans, they are faithful and loyal whether you are No. 1 or last place on a chart,” admitted Brust. “They don’t care what label you’re on – as long as someone is paying attention and wants to get the music out to them. That’s when they get fired up. They want to see us in the spotlight because they have stood by us for so long. There are days where we can get a little down sometimes, and the fans pick us up during a show, and make us want to keep on going down the road. I think they have fueled us as much as we’ve fueled them.” That hunger for their music by the audience has accounted for (to date) ten million views on YouTube.



The coming year will bring the fans what they have been clamoring for – new music. And, with the ultimate All-Star team at Reviver in play, Lucas says that the future is bright. “We know we can make this new record deal very successful. We’ve done our due diligence. We have throw kindling all over the place, and it’s time to light it. We’ve got a lot of great fans and people who believe in us. I don’t think you can be in a better position than what we are right now. We have studied with the best, and “For The First Time Ever,” we are confident that our songs and live performances are at the top of their game, so get ready to experience Livin’ Loud with LOCASH.”
High Valley
High Valley
HIGH VALLEY

High Valley's major label debut single "Make You Mine" (Atlantic / Warner Music Nashville) is an exercise in balance and purity of expression. By combining their bluegrass roots with a modern pulse, brothers Brad and Curtis Rempel have created something that feels simultaneously fresh and timeless.

Beginning with a burst of turbocharged acoustic guitar, the tune builds momentum with a fouron-the-floor kick drum and rousing group choruses that beg to be shouted at full-volume. This energetic attack is mirrored by the determination and confidence in the lyrics, aimed at winning cover a "soul miner's daughter." Also remarkable is how "Make You Mine" refuses to be overwhelmed by electric instrumentation, staying close to its acoustic core. That was a very conscious decision, according to mandolin player/harmony vocalist Curtis.

"Even getting some buddies in the studio and just shouting out lyrics, bringing energy in that way instead of always defaulting to crunchy guitars and things like that," says Curtis. "That's what we're all about."

Earlier this year, Brad and Curtis played the song at the Grand Ole Opry and were fortunate to be accompanied in the hallowed circle by one of their biggest influences, Ricky Skaggs. Though Skaggs' early '80s heyday pre-dates either brother, they've been longtime fans since discovering him on the lone AM radio station they could receive growing up. While their upbringing in a close-knit remote community didn't exactly acquaint them with all of popular music, it did help cement the musical ideals and love of simple, classic country that still inform the duo to this day.

High Valley is currently working on their new album due in 2016.
Venue Information:
Preakness InfieldFest at Pimlico Race Course
5201 Park Heights Avenue
Baltimore, MD, 21215
http://www.preakness.com/infield/infieldfest