of Montreal – Tickets – 9:30 Club – Washington, DC – December 14th, 2012

of Montreal

of Montreal

Foxygen, French Horn Rebellion

Fri 12/14/12

8:00 pm

of Montreal - (Set time: 10:45 PM)
of Montreal


“A golden despondency” is how Kevin Barnes translates the meaning behind Aureate Gloom, the title he gave of Montreal’s thirteenth full-length album. The oxymoron is one Barnes says best describes the overall state of his life and mental outlook while working on the record: first on a writing retreat in New York City, then while demoing tracks in Athens, before finally recording at Sonic Ranch, just across the border from Juarez, Mexico in the Texan desert.

If you’re wondering what exactly would lead Barnes to use this epithet to describe his reality at the time, look no further than the songs themselves. While many bands rely on vague platitudes as an attempt to make their songs universally applicable, Barnes chooses to take the opposite tact — penning lyrics so personal they sound like entries ripped from a journal that should be permanently kept under lock and key. “I was going through a very stormy period in my life and felt like I was just completely trashed,” reveals Barnes. “I might be guilty of sharing or exposing too much of my private life, but to me the best albums are those that help people connect with an artist on a deep, human level and that do so without too much artifice or evasiveness.”

For inspiration — and to put a bit of distance between himself and the events and people he writes so unequivocally about — Barnes spent two weeks in New York City this past spring. While there, he wandered around Chelsea, Greenwich Village, SoHo, and Chinatown, imagining what it was like 40 years ago, picturing himself as Tom Verlaine or Patti Smith, or James Chance. Lead single “Bassem Sabry” (named for the Egyptian journalist who died tragically in the spring of 2014), is perhaps of Montreal’s most political song to date, with Barnes proclaiming “Every leader is a cellophane punk,” while handclaps and danceable drums incite the listener to follow his command: “If you hear me, say ‘Yeah!’ ‘Yeah!’ ‘Yeah!’” The energy remains high for “Last Rites At The Jane Hotel,” which channels Barnes innermost T. Rex while staying
true to of Montreal’s signature kaleidoscopic song structure. “Empyrean Abattoir” begins dark and brooding before unfurling into a revved up Television-inspired outro, as all the while Barnes lays bare his most gut-wrenching lyrics. Closing track “Like Ashoka’s Inferno Of Memory” ends the record on an appropriately epic note, reveling in its seemingly effortless shifting of tempos and tones — a microcosm, really, of the overall album’s auditory audaciousness.

Like 2013’s Lousy with Sylvianbriar, Aureate Gloom was recorded directly to tape with musicians Kevin Barnes (guitar, vocals), Clayton Rychlik (drums), Bob Parins (bass), Bennett Lewis (guitar), and JoJo Glidewell (keys), plus the help of engineer Drew Vandenberg. Having already spent many of the previous months touring together, the strength of the members’ musical rapport was instantly apparent. The group completed nearly a song a day during their stay in the desert and even wrote a brand new track on the spot, “Apollyon Of Blue Room,” whose title references a supposedly haunted bedroom in a hacienda on the studio grounds. Working at such a breakneck pace, there was no time to nitpick, to dissect, to overanalyze. Only later, upon arriving back home, was Barnes able to take a step back and fully appreciate what he and his band had accomplished. With Aureate Gloom, of Montreal have created one of the most unflinching, confessional and starkly emotional albums in their oeuvre.
Foxygen - (Set time: 9:45 PM)
Foxygen


Foxygen is the bi-coastal songwriting duo of Sam France (vocals, Olympia, Wash., 22 years old) and Jonathan Rado (guitar/keyboards, NYC, 22). They are the raw, de-Wes Andersonization of The Rolling Stones, Kinks, Velvets, Bowie, etc. that a whole mess of young people desperately need. They create a sometimes-impressionistic, sometimes-hyper-real portrait of sounds from specific places and times. Yet, it never comes across as anything but absolutely modern music. They bring the manic, freewheeling qualities of an artist like Ariel Pink to those aforementioned influences to make for one of the most refreshing listens of the year. They are the real deal and total savants. Their albums are love letters to vinyl collections.

Jagjaguwar is proud to share with you Foxygen’s bedroom masterpiece, Take the Kids Off Broadway.

The first track, “Abandon my Toys,” only gives you two seconds of electronic soundery before acoustic instruments take over along with a vocal that sounds channeled in by a medium. “Why Did I Get Married?” plays like a mournful lounge act until about the two minute mark, when it starts to crash into something else, and a gooey kind of Ray Davies vocal gives way to shouts and barks. After you listen to even a few songs on the album, any attempt to define its genre will start with a discussion and end with a shrug, maybe a “rock and roll?” or a “psychedelic?” And that’s how shit needs to be said. More question marks. Less periods. Less declarations. Cause it’s only questions that can take us where we need to be, to a place of profound and active ignorance. As a tiny organism adrift on a sea of infinite nuance, ignorance is the only honest state of being. And Take the Kids off Broadway is an album full of question marks. It’s time for a motherfucking paradigm shift. Foxygen knows this. Or at least they sound like they do. A hard rain’s going to fall. Get ready.
French Horn Rebellion - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
French Horn Rebellion
Written, produced and mixed by brothers Robert and David Perlick-Molinari, The Infinite Music… is a debut album that warps the fabric of dance, electro, rock and funk and may just turn out to be a contender for this year’s most ambitious, multi-faceted and engaging debut album. Crucially, the album also follows an intergalactic narrative that tracks the physical and emotional journey of an unknown French horn player. “There is a story running through the album, it’s about the Universe. We’re pretty clear on what the story is, but what you take away from it may be something entirely different,” says David.


The Brooklyn-based duo already had an illustrious pedigree; David produced MGMT's indie release, Time to Pretend EP for New York indie Cantora Records, and with previous single “Up All Night” they scored a Record of the Week on BBC Radio 1 and an opening slot on the influential Kitsuné Maison compilation series. The band have also remixed the likes of Sleigh Bells, JD Samson & MEN, Two Door Cinema Club, OMD and Alex Winston.
Venue Information:
9:30 Club
815 V St. NW
Washington, DC, 20001
http://930.com