St. Paul & the Broken Bones

St. Paul & the Broken Bones

Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas

Thu, October 16

Doors: 7:00 pm

St. Paul & the Broken Bones - (Set time: 9:30 PM)


Sea of Noise, the second full-length album by St. Paul and the Broken Bones, marks a quantum leap in sound and style for the high-voltage Birmingham, Alabama-based band.

Produced by Paul Butler and recorded at Nashville’s Sound Emporium, the group’s sophomore effort features an expanded eight-piece lineup of the widely praised soul-based rock unit. Longtime members Paul Janeway (lead vocals), Jesse Phillips (bass, guitar), Browan Lollar (guitars), Andrew Lee (drums), Al Gamble (keyboards), and Allen Branstetter (trumpet) are joined by Jason Mingledorff (saxophone, clarinet, flute), and Chad Fisher (trombone).

The collection of new original songs is the group’s first release on RECORDS, a joint venture of SONGS Publishing, winner of ASCAP’s 2016 independent publisher of the year award, and veteran label executive Barry Weiss.

Sea of Noise is a successor to the Broken Bones’ 2013 debut album Half the City, which introduced the group’s blazing mating of ‘60s soul fire – daubed with latter-day influences like Sly Stone, David Bowie, and Prince -- to Janeway’s impassioned singing and writing. The new album witnesses a deepening and broadening of the unit’s musical reach and lyrical concerns.

“It felt like it happened organically,” Janeway says of the band’s development. “With the last record, it was like doing things with your hair on fire – going in, recording it live. There’s a sense of urgency to having a record like that. We were only a band for about five months at that point. I didn’t know my voice – I’d never done this professionally. I was just learning more nuance, and about carrying a melody. You don’t have to go for it 100% all the time. You can draw people in by giving and taking.”

Janeway says that he and his close musical associate Phillips began to ponder the direction of the band’s second album a year and a half ago. “If we had been forced to go into a studio a year and a half ago, we probably would have done a better version of Half the City,” he says. “There would have been nothing wrong with that. But we started evolving, or changing.”

Work began in earnest during last year’s Coachella festival in California: “We rented a house in San Bernardino Valley National Park. The week in between the two weekends, we really started to hash things out. Then we rented out a very hot warehouse in Birmingham where we could write. And me and Jesse and a few of us would send stuff back and forth via Dropbox. That gave me the ability to work on harmonies on the vocals. I wanted to take it up a notch, in all realms.”

Looking to such inspirations as Tom Waits and Nick Cave, Janeway was intent on lifting his game as a songwriter on material for the second album. “I’m married to a woman with a masters in literature, and I can’t show her lyrics unless I’m pretty proud of ‘em,” he says. “I had to sit and think about what I’m saying – what do I want to say, is there anything to say? What’s my perspective as this Southern kid who’s watching the modern world and feeling very much like an alien in a lot of ways. This is more personal. If you’re going to say something, say something, and don’t waste your breath unless you feel like you’re saying something.”




Janeway adds that his reading of the book Just Mercy by Bryan Stevenson, founder of the Equal Justice Initiative, played a role in the direction of the work: “I didn’t want it to be an overly political record, but I feel it shows up a little bit on the album.”

With a full complement of new songs in hand, St. Paul and the Broken Bones entered the studio with Butler, leader of the British band the Bees and producer of Devendra Banhart and Michael Kiwanuka.

“Jesse was listening to one of his records and he said, ‘Everything sounds great,’” Janeway recalls. “It sounded like a real record – everything had depth, and was expansive-sounding. Butler ended up being the guy that we wanted to use. Producer-wise, I think we knocked a home run. He is very meticulous.”

On Sea of Noise, the band’s brawny horn-driven sound is augmented – and displaced -- by the use of a string quartet and a vocal choir. The strings – recorded at Memphis’ historic Sam Phillips Recording by engineer Jeff Powell – were arranged by Lester Snell, a veteran of Stax Records sessions by Isaac Hayes, Shirley Brown, Albert King, and the Staple Singers, among many others. Janeway says of Snell, “He did all these classic, great records in Memphis – he did the string arrangements on them. The strings, for us, supply a darker tone. Horns sometimes can’t portray a certain darkness. We thought that would be the best option, instead of horn lines. We have songs on this record that don’t have any horns at all.”

Employed on “Crumbling Light Posts,” the recurring motif that appears three times on the album, Jason Clark and the Tennessee Mass Choir were recorded in another legendary Memphis facility. “The Stax Museum let us go in there after hours and record the choir,” Janeway says, adding with a laugh. “We said, ‘Well, hell, we’re in Memphis, let’s just see if they’ll do it.’ It was pretty neat, I’m not gonna lie.”

He says of the finished work, “Sea of Noise is not quite a full-blown concept record. It is focused in terms of subject matter – finding redemption and salvation and hope. ‘Crumbling Light Posts’ comes from an old Winston Churchill quote, in which he said England was a crumbling lighthouse in a sea of darkness. I always thought that was a really interesting concept – that we’re falling anyway. In this day and age, it is the noise that has defined so many things. We’re going to fall to it eventually, but for now we feel like our heads are above water. It felt anthemic.”

The album’s lyrical and emotional richness is heard loudly in stunning new compositions like “Burning Rome” (which Janeway describes as “a letter to God, if I could write it”) and the startling “I’ll Be Your Woman,” which knocks traditional soul music gender roles on their heads. Janeway says of the latter song, “I wrote that with Jesse, and he said, ‘If I can write that song, I can die a happy man, because I’ve finally made something that I feel can stand up to my standards.’”

St. Paul and the Broken Bones, which toured extensively in the U.S. and Europe behind their debut album, will put their take-no-prisoners live show on the road this fall. Their most recent concert work included arena dates opening for the Rolling Stones in Atlanta and Buffalo. Some acts may have been daunted by such a task, but not this one.

“It was pretty neat, it was pretty crazy,” Janeway says. “I love the Rolling Stones, but my train of thought it, you gotta try and blow ‘em off the stage. And that’s still my goal.”
Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas - (Set time: 8:15 PM)
Jessica Hernandez & the Deltas


Jessica Hernandez: vocals, guitar, keys, percussion
Michael Krygier: guitar, vocals *
Steve Lehane; bass, vocals *
Taylor Pierson: keys, accordion, vocals *
John Raleeh: trombone *
Stephen Stetson: drums

Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas have arrived at last with their long awaited Instant Records debut, SECRET EVIL. The album sees the Detroit-­‐based band serving up a brilliantly polyglot sonic stew – equal parts rockabilly and surf pop, cabaret jazz and funky reggae, Latin psych and Gypsy punk – all cooked up on the hot Motor City pavement and seasoned by that distinctly Detroit combination of blasted R&B, showband theatrics, and limitless rock ‘n’ soul energy. Songs like “Caught Up” and the syncopated “No Place Left To Hide” showcase Hernandez’s unstoppable vocals and breath of musical ambition, braiding contemporary pop thrills with an original and unmistakable creative persona all her own. Dizzying in its range and ambition, SECRET EVIL is fresh, focused, and surprising, a remarkable debut album from an indescribably compelling new band.

“We get called a lot of different things from a lot of different people,” Hernandez says. “It’s a combination of stuff that’s really fun and dark and makes you feel a whole range of emotions.”

Born and raised in Detroit, Hernandez headed off to Chicago’s Columbia College at
17 but dropped out two years later in order to devote her ample energy to music. She moved to Kansas City, where, despite having only rudimentary skills, she bought and then taught herself guitar and piano.

“I picked it up really easily,” she says. “I found that I knew how things should sound,
how to form a chord just by listening to the instrument. Every day I would learn a
couple of chords and write another song.”

Hernandez pushed hard, penning a ream of sensitive singer/songwriter-­‐inspired tunes and educating herself in the art of lo fi recording. She eventually returned to Detroit and in 2009, united the five-­‐man Deltas. Though initially just a provisional arrangement, Hernandez and the powerhouse combo promptly made their bones as a preternaturally volatile live act, capable of full force raw power, wide-­‐ranging emotion, and inventive, dramatic stagecraft.

“I thought it was going to be temporary,” she says, “but it just worked so well. It felt so great having these amazing musicians play songs I’d written in a way I never could’ve done on my own. All of a sudden my sound had a darker, soulful big band vibe. It freed me up to go a lot of different ways. I didn’t need to be stuck doing just the one thing.”


Despite her long-­‐standing commitment to artistic independence, Hernandez signed with Blue Note and then opted to record her debut album with a producer rather than on her own. She met with a number of top studio hands, ultimately choosing to team with GRAMMY® Award-­‐winner Milo Froideval.

“Milo and I hit it off immediately,” she says, “I felt really comfortable with him, which is the best thing you can ask for when you’re trying to be creative. We have similar personalities, a similar sense of humor. Part of that I think is coming from a Latin background. He felt like family, in a sense.”

In 2012, Hernandez and her Deltas headed down to El Paso’s renowned Sonic Ranch, located on 2,300 acres of pecan orchards bordering the Rio Grande and Mexico. Froideval indeed proved the ideal collaborator, from enlisting some of Mexico City’s finest mariachi horns to helping Hernandez articulate her myriad musical ideas even after the sessions had wrapped.

“We would hang out, have a couple of beers, and try things,” she says. “Experimenting with different tones to make it a little more unique. It was really open.”

Alas, the Blue Note deal broke down and the recordings were soon locked in limbo. Set free at last in 2013 by Blue Note President Don Was, Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas promptly joined forces with Instant Records, the independent label founded by legendary producer, songwriter and record executive Richard Gottehrer (Blondie, The Go-­‐Gos, Dum Dum Girls). Hernandez culled a few choice cuts from the Sonic Ranch sessions, recorded a couple of new tracks live to tape, and released
2013’s acclaimed DEMONS. The EP earned national acclaim, with PopMatters hailing it as “an accomplished document that proves the band deserves all the hype they’ve been garnering.” “(Hernandez is) painting a very big picture,” declared The Huffington Post, “and her memorable voice is only one of the textured colors on a multidimensional palette.”

SECRET EVIL reveals all the many hues in Hernandez’s 120-­‐count box of crayons. Despite its vintage, the album is in fact so contemporary one would be forgiven for assuming it was recorded two years from now. Songs like “Over” and the rollicking “Sorry I Stole Your Man” crank like Wanda Jackson fronting The Seeds in an Acapulco dive bar, The Deltas busting out their wicked blend of girl group melodies, driving arrangements, and infectious energy. A self-­‐described storyteller at heart, Hernandez chronicles her personal trials and triumphs throughout SECRET EVIL, all in the hope of touching a truly universal chord. Tender tracks like “Cry Cry Cry” and the album-­‐closing “Lovers First” stand out as snapshots of experiences, intimacies, and moments that matter.

“My favorite songs ended up being the ballads,” Hernandez says. “I feel like I can almost hear myself starting to cry. Maybe that’s something only I will know, because at the time we recorded the vocal performances, the situations I’m singing about

were still so relevant, still so present in my life. It’s amazing to be able to have a point like that in your life captured, even if there were things that you probably wouldn’t want to remember.”

Jessica Hernandez & The Deltas are now primed and raring to bring their ineffably cool Midwestern rock ‘n’ soul to an overheated venue near you. Having waited patiently to unleash SECRET EVIL, Hernandez is now fully prepared to call the highway her home, at least for the foreseeable future.

“The album is finally being released and I could not be more excited,” she says. “Now it's time to get back in my van with my boys and show everyone why this record means so much to me.”
Venue Information:
9:30 Club
815 V St. NW
Washington, DC, 20001
http://930.com