Big Something & Too Many Zooz

All Good Presents...

Big Something & Too Many Zooz

Electric Love Machine

Sat, December 22

Doors: 7:00 pm

9:30 Club

Washington, DC

$20

Big Something
Big Something


A 6 piece powerhouse with a sound that is both unique and timeless, Big Something fuses elements of rock, pop, funk, and improvisation to take listeners on a journey through a myriad of musical styles. It's no secret why this group has quickly become one of the most exciting new bands to emerge from the Southeast. Soaring guitars, EWI (electronic wind instrument), synths, horns and alluring vocal hooks rise to the top of their infectious collection of songs and represent a sound that has caught the ears of such revered stalwarts as Umphrey's McGee, Moon Taxi, Galactic, moe., Robert Randolph, and even The B52s, who have all tapped Big Something as direct support.
Recently, the band released their 5th studio album The Otherside on April 20th, 2018 as a follow up to their 2017 album Tumbleweed. The Otherside was recorded at Echo Mountain Studios in Asheville, NC with the help of Grammy-nominated producer and Carolina Music Awards Lifetime Achievement recipient - John Custer (Corrosion of Conformity) who has produced all 5 of the bands albums.
On The Otherside, Big Something continues to build upon the post-apocalyptic peyote trip imagery from Tumbleweed, concluding the story of a nomad who has made it to the other side of his journey wandering through the night towards a desert sunrise. The album also showcases a different musical side of the band with a heavier, more focused and soulful collection of 8 songs including "Smoke Signal," and "Wildfire."
Big Something is Nick MacDaniels (vocals, guitar), Casey Cranford (sax, EWI), Jesse Hensley (lead guitar), Ben Vinograd (drums), Doug Marshall (bass), Josh Kagel (keys, trumpet), and Rhett Huffman (keys).
Too Many Zooz
Too Many Zooz


At the 2016 CMA Awards one sound burst from the stage like a thunderquake. As Beyoncé performed "Daddy Lessons" accompanied by Dixie Chicks and Too Many Zooz -- the New York City trio which originally recorded the song on the star's Lemonadealbum -- TMZ brought the sound of the street to Beyoncé's glittering musical declaration. Glued to their smart phones, tablets, and TVs, America beheld Too Many Zooz' innovative polyglot style.

Beyoncé and Dixie Chicks sashayed the song's verses in a rollicking country vibe, but as the performance neared midpoint, a tall, burly baritone saxophonist with a luminous white pompadour took the stage like a bar-walking gladiator. TMZ's Leo P danced, shimmied, and shaked, matching Beyoncé move for move, while blowing growling saxophone notes that infused urban funk to "Daddy Lessons"' two-beat country jig. TMZ trumpeter Matt Doe and drummer King of Sludge performed on the stage's backline as a blaring brass line raised "Daddy Lessons"' intensity, followed by Beyoncé and Dixie Chicks slamming song's political theme home.

Too Many Zooz's saxophonist Pellegrino, trumpeter Matt Doe, and drummer King of Sludge held Nashville's Bridgestone Arena stage for mere minutes, but the same talent that moved Beyoncé to have the group record both "Daddy Lessons" and "Formation" on Lemonade has seen TMZ sell thousands of CDs and downloads, and inspired viral videos.

Too Many Zooz's manic music, dubbed "BrassHouse" by drummer King of Sludge, is an irresistible rocket that combines styles more diverse and far-flung than any international space station. As heard on the group's EPs -- F NOTE, Fanimals, Brasshouse Volume 1: Survival of the Flyest, The Internet, and the LP, Subway Gawdz -- Too Many Zooz creates a visceral smack-to-the-senses. TMZ's BrassHouse summons EDM, house, techno, and glitch, paired to the indigenous punch of Cuban, Afro-Cuban, Caribbean, and Brazilian Carnival rhythms. TMZ's music is further heightened by the dancing and saxophone soloing prowess of Pellegrino, virtually a bionic Pepper Adams. Like Nortec Collective mashed with Daft Punk by way of a mad sonic scientist, Too Many Zooz has conquered New York City -- your headset's resistance is futile.

"We pride ourselves that nearly every person of every color, creed and background and upbringing can find something in our music to relate to," Matt Doe says. "Someone from Cuba can say 'I hear Cuban music in the cowbells.' Someone into death metal will enjoy it next to a grandmother who hears it as old swing music. Others hear Klezmer. Whatever people want to hear in our music they can seemingly find it."

Many New Yorkers discovered Too Many Zooz at the Union Square subway station, where the trio began busking in 2014. After one of TMZ's videos went viral on Reddit, creating almost a million fans, sales of the band's digital downloads and CD sales skyrocketed.

If TMZ's music wasn't already electrifying, Leo Pellegrino's dance moves, which spin like a Zoot-suit wearing swinger, add visual thrills to the band's musical mastery. A classically trained musician, Pellegrino began dancing as both expression and rebellion. What Beyoncé loved is now available to all.

"Horn players, especially baritone saxophone players, look so lame on stage!" Pellegrino notes. "I just watched an NBA half-time show and this band's horn players were killing my eyes. I wondered 'why does the horn have to be such a lame instrument visually?' I began dancing in the subway and people loved it. I realized that I had been brainwashed, all my teachers telling me not to move. I'd been told that was improper technique, but that became my key to success."

Too Many Zooz's songs are marvels of simplicity born of musical complexity. Pellegrino, Doe, and King of Sludge condense multiple -- what might be considered clashing styles -- into a riveting jackhammer brew. King of Sludge's staccato eighth-note rhythms performed on a unique bass drum/cowbell/jamblock/cymbal setup forms the music's gritty rhythmic bed. Matt Doe's trumpet provides melody and harmony, while Leo Pelligrino's saxophone follows rhythm directions and solo revelry.

"I don't like using standardized terms when describing our music," Matt explains. "We're all doing things that are out of the ordinary. I provide the synth sound you would hear in a dance track. Leo plays saxophone but he's also providing the bass sound you would hear in electronic music. When Leo solos, it's like a breakdown when the bass is the featured element of the band. I don't solo per se, but I am playing nearly the entire show. It doesn't make sense for me to play more!"

TMZ's seeds were formed when Indiana native King of Sludge, and Boston-born Pellegrino played in subway busking band, Drumadics. Fellow Manhattan School of Music classmate and Pittsburgh native Doe played in various ensembles with Pellegrino, the threesome eventually busking together by chance -- their chemistry sparking an instant bond.

"From the start, we were all bouncing off each other, listening to each other and not thinking too much," Doe says.

TMZ have collaborated with Galatic, Kreayshawn, Jerry "Wonda" Duplessis, and, of course, Beyoncé.

"Knowing that Beyoncé enjoys our music on her own time?" ponders King of Sludge. "That's a great thing."

What's next for TMZ? The trio's upcoming EP will feature a rawer sound, the group returning to their original roots, and most likely, their original 14th Street subway station.

"When we began, it was just trumpet, saxophone and drums," Leo says. "Our first EP was pretty straight up, then we added production and guests and vocalists on SubwayGawdz. This next EP is back to our roots."

Does TMZ recommend the subway path to stardom?

"The subway, then videos and Beyoncé helped propel our popularity," Matt says. "The subway is a great promotional vehicle. There's nowhere else that you can reach such a wide demographic. If you want to get out and be seen and up your numbers, go to the subway. That's always part of our business plan."
Electric Love Machine
Electric Love Machine


Electric Love Machine is a Future Wave/Space Disco quartet from Baltimore MD. Their style was born out of the Livetronica/Jam Band scene, and since it's inception has morphed into a musical powerhouse with masterful songwriting and roller coaster jams. Over the past five years their sound has evolved considerably while touching on the entire spectrum of human emotion; mixing the dark with the light, the pop with the jam, the disco with the metal, all while sprinkling retro, funky overtones throughout.

The band has gone through a few lineup changes but has stayed mainly comprised of Jon Wood on guitar and vocals, Jon Brady on keys and vocals, and Alex Lang on bass. The band has consistently played close to or more than 100 shows a year and has had a considerable amount of time to hone their craft. Their high energy performances are often accompanied by mind bending visuals by the incomparable Jack Thomas that complement the music and it’s driving improvisational nature.

"Love Deluxe", Electric Love Machine's second album, was released in April of 2017 to overwhelmingly positive reviews and is a culmination of the past few years of the band’s writing. "Xenofonex", the band's first studio effort was released in 2013 and contains many of the band’s classics. A live album titled "Res Hits Vol. 1" is being finalized and will be available for digital download in the near future as well as the first EP in a duology titled "Future Creatures Pt.1".
Venue Information:
9:30 Club
815 V St. NW
Washington, DC, 20001
http://930.com